Photo of the Day

World Cup: July 10, 2014

Netherlands loses, Argentina wins.

Argentina’s players run to celebrate after teammate Maxi Rodriguez scored the last penalty as Netherlands’ players react at the end of the World Cup semifinal soccer match between the Netherlands and Argentina at the Itaquerao Stadium in Sao Paulo Brazil, Wednesday, July 9, 2014. Argentina reached the World Cup final on Wednesday after beating the Netherlands 4-2 in a penalty shootout. (AP)

Football And Racism

Brazil Racism Out of View at World Cup

A woman passes by a graffiti in Salvador da Bahia, Brazil, June 18, 2013.

 

The World Cup will end this Sunday in Brazil, a nation with the world’s largest black population outside of Africa.  Although many Brazilians think of their country as the model of race relations, racism is a hidden reality.

On the country’s Atlantic shore, the tropical city of Salvador de Bahia faces the African coastline far beyond the horizon.  It’s a a city symbolic for Brazil’s African roots.

Slavery was abolished in Brazil in 1888 and here, more than anywhere else, the links with Africa are evident.  In Salvador, African descendants represent more than 80 percent of the population.  In Brazil, more than 50 percent of the population is of “metis,” or mixed-race – and social contact, friendships and marriage between the races are common.

Read more here at VOAnews.com

 

 

Ouch! (Not Really...)

How Effective Are Those World Cup “Injuries”?

People use mobile devices to take pictures of an advertising placard showing Uruguay's striker Luis Suarez flashing his teeth, Copacabana beach, Rio de Janeiro, June 26, 2014.

 

Anyone watching the World Cup is familiar with the head-knocking, pushing, elbowing and even biting that occurs on the field — and how players on the receiving end of those maneuvers sometimes react in dramatic, seemingly exaggerated ways.

But do those histrionics, real or faked, actually help teams to win?

Read more from VOA’s Adam Phillips here.